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Picture: September Sun In Ventnor

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Whilst we move into the autumn, the sun is still out on the island, as seen in a picture from this weekend. We still have availability for limited September weeks, as well as autumn and winter breaks from just £240.

Picture: Ventnor From La Falaise

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A view across Ventnor seafront, pier and beach from La Falaise.

Ventnor From La Falaise

Picture: Sheep At Luccombe

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These lucky sheep have a good view! If you’d like to enjoy it, Highlands and The Priory are just down the road and allow you to see right across Sandown Bay.

Sheep At Luccombe

Picture: Spring At Highlands

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Over at Highlands, the highlight of spring is the daffodils that pop up in the garden. Having undertaken the conversion over several years, there wasn’t any life in the garden. However, as soon as the garden was finished, in its first spring, daffodils were appearing around the garden.

With the site being unused since the early 1990s, the daffodils date back to at least then and may be even older. Along with the selection of trees, many of which grew whilst the site was unused, there is our landmark sweet chestnut, which, by our calculations, dates back to the 1870s and must have been planted by Sir James Thomson Ritchie, the first owner of the original Highlands.

Daffodils At Highlands

Pictures: Luccombe Coastal Path

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Here are a selection of photos from the coastal path through Luccombe to Ventnor. A perfect walk alongside countryside, National Trust land and coastal views.

Appuldurcombe House

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Appuldurcombe House

If you are looking for a day out where you can step back into time and live like a lord or lady of the manor, then look no further than Appuldurcombe House.

The house was originally one of the grandest on the island and home to Worsley family. An example of baroque architecture, the current house was dates back to 1702 and a house has been on the site since 1100, when it was originally a priory and later a convent. Over the years, the house has been extended and in later life, it became a hotel, an academy for young gentlemen and home for the monks that would later move to Quarr Abbey.

Appuldurcombe House – Grounds

However, its most significant time was during the Second World War, when the house was taken over by the military. In 1943, the beginning of the end for the house took place when a bomb hit close by and a large hole appeared in the roof. With the hole unrepaired, the house gradually deteriorated and much of the house was sold off, leaving the shell that can be seen today.

Appuldurcombe House – Farmland

Now, the house is open to the public to wander around the remainder of the house and see its grand proportions and imagine what it would have been like in its heyday. You can also explore the grounds, see the farm animals that graze on the land and see what remains of the garden designed by the famous Capability Brown. A small section of the house has been reroofed, which is available for weddings.

Entry is free – so why not pop in and then travel along the road to its free neighbour, the Isle of Wight Donkey Sanctuary.

For more, visit english-heritage.org.uk.

Picture: Spyglass Inn, Ventnor

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It may only be February but the sun is shining on the Isle of Wight, as shown on the picture taken this morning outside the Spyglass Inn on Ventnor Esplanade.

2018 is already booking up fast with guests already having stayed in January and booked through to October, so get your holiday booked to avoid disappointment.

Spyglass Inn, Ventnor

Photo: Sunny Times In Ventnor

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The sun is shining on the Isle of Wight, so why not book a last minute break? You can visit our Booking page to check our late availability.

Here’s Orchard Bay in Ventnor recently, just next door to the Ventnor Botanic Gardens:

Orchard Bay Steps Ventnor